The CME Group Loses Irreplaceable Talent with Kim Taylor’s Retirement

The CME Group Loses Irreplaceable Talent with Kim Taylor’s Retirement

My friend Kim announced her retirement from the CME Group on Friday, Dec 1.  When I first heard the news, my initial thought was that the CME will lose an irreplaceable and unparalleled talent. As one of the most powerful women in the capiKim Taylor April 13tal markets, Kim taught me that gender doesn’t matter but rather it’s your hard work that sets you apart.

I met Kim through our mutual friend John McPartland (McP).  Kim worked for McP when she first started working at the CME in 1989.  Brought in as a senior analyst in the Business Development Group, they were part of an internal consulting group that vetted new technology services.  McP said that she asked really good questions during her interview and even though didn’t know specifics, she demonstrated an understanding of the business before she even started in the space.

With the inception of Women In Listed Derivatives (WILD) in 2009, I had the opportunity to bring together influential women and talk about how we could advance and highlight each other’s careers.  Every once in awhile, I reached out to Kim and asked for her input with WILD initiatives.  She always provided insight into organization goals and made herself available to be a keynote speaker or a panelist at WILD events.

When WILD was experiencing growing pains, Kim gave me one of the best pieces of advice. She said, “don’t trip over your own dick, Jessica.”  Phupinder Gill taught her that gem meaning we shouldn’t let our egos or insecurities get in the way of our, or in this case WILD’s, growth.  I relayed the story a few years later to Lynne Marek.

As an emerging woman, it was a lot of follow up on my part with a very experienced and accomplished woman to forge the friendship I have with Kim today.  I remember when I was deliberating the opportunity to work at the National Futures Association (NFA). It was at a CME press dinner after FIA Expo 2011, that I waited until everyone got their quotes from Kim before approaching her with my update.  Kim walked me through the pros and cons of the NFA job.

Kim was always at industry conferences so when she did not show up to FIA Boca in 2013, I knew something was wrong.  It was McP who told me Kim had cancer. We were all upset but the entire industry joined Team KT to support her.  A victory in the battle revealed her positive outlook and ability to bring together a community.

As I look back on my experiences with Kim, it is easy for me to see how she became a friend and mentor.  She is a true industry role model. She taught me that as a woman, I didn’t need to change myself or play up my gender to fit into what people call a man’s world.

I want to wish her luck, success and relaxing days as she embarks on this new chapter in life.

16 Comments
  • Linda Haven
    Posted at 02:13h, 03 December Reply

    I couldn’t agree with you more, Jessica. Kim has been a wonderful industry leader and friend to many.

    • Jessica Darmoni
      Posted at 13:01h, 04 December Reply

      Thank you!

  • Kathy UCHYN-TISCH
    Posted at 17:26h, 03 December Reply

    So well said Jessica – Kim was one of a kind and will be missed.

    • Jessica Darmoni
      Posted at 13:01h, 04 December Reply

      Thank you!

  • Leslie Sutphen
    Posted at 11:26h, 04 December Reply

    Great personal reflection Jessica.

    • Jessica Darmoni
      Posted at 13:01h, 04 December Reply

      Thank you!

  • Nancy Stern
    Posted at 14:34h, 04 December Reply

    Well put, Jessica! You were smart to be persistent in getting to know Kim. She has a lot of wisdom to share.

    • Jessica Darmoni
      Posted at 15:18h, 04 December Reply

      Thank you!

  • Leticia Manos
    Posted at 14:51h, 04 December Reply

    Very inspirational.. Thank you for this

    • Jessica Darmoni
      Posted at 15:18h, 04 December Reply

      Thank you!

  • Jim Oliff
    Posted at 15:55h, 04 December Reply

    This is a major loss for CME. Kim had insight and foresight second to none. She understood risk and understood her clients, she had empathy and operated in a manner where she sought compliance and not with a heavy hand that sought to fine and punish for mistakes. Kim was leading the digitization effort at CME as well as overseeing the Clearing House. She will definitely be missed.

    • Jessica Darmoni
      Posted at 16:02h, 04 December Reply

      Agree. Well said. Thank you.

  • larry arnowitz
    Posted at 18:24h, 05 December Reply

    Nicely written Jessica. Kim was truly a special person, and always willing to lend a hand or offer advice when asked. She understands the industry as well as any person in the space. Her laugh is legendary, as is she. Kim deserves rest, peace, and lots of fun!! Good luck

    • Jessica Darmoni
      Posted at 20:35h, 05 December Reply

      Thank you! I agree.

  • Vincent Mattera
    Posted at 00:04h, 10 December Reply

    Jessica,

    Great article. This is spot on! Kim ventured into a man’s world and took it over. She is a true leader and will be missed by everyone!

    • Jessica Darmoni
      Posted at 00:07h, 10 December Reply

      Thank you!

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